Syrian refugees are seen at the Reyhanli Refugee Camp in Antakya, Turkey. (File photo) Russia China Syria Iran Bashar Assad Syria's problems protests in Syria Damascus Beijing Tehran the people of Syria the Syrian government in Syria Putin the hinese president Russian president the Syrian president Tao Hvjyn Terrorist forces in Syria armed men in Syria
Syrian refugees are seen at the Reyhanli Refugee Camp in Antakya, Turkey. (File photo)
An international donor conference has kicked off in Kuwait to collect funds for the Syrian civilians who have been affected by the prolonged conflict in Syria.


The one-day conference was inaugurated on Wednesday with the aim of raising 1.5 billion dollars for the Syrian civilians who are living in the dire conditions caused by the ongoing violence in the country.

The UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon also attended the conference, urging both the Syrian government and the opposition to put an end to the conflict.

Ban reiterated the importance of collecting financial aid for the troubled Syrian civilians, saying that, “The situation in Syria is catastrophic."

He went on to say that the civilians are "suffering tremendously and we should give them the right assistance.”

Meanwhile, Kuwait has pledged a USD 300 million in aid to the Syrians. "Due to the great sufferings of the Syrian people and to help ensure the success of the conference, I announce the Kuwaiti donation of USD 300 million for the Syrian people," Kuwait Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmed al-Sabah told the participants.

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said in mid-January that 100,000 more Syrians have left the country over the past month, and the total number of refugees has now topped the 600,000 mark.

The UN refugee agency said a total of 612,134 Syrians had been registered or were in the process of being registered as refugees in Syria’s neighboring countries and North Africa and nearly 176,600 others have been registered in Jordan.

Moreover, at least 1,100 Syrians cross the Jordanian border every day, according to the UNHCR.

The Syria unrest began in March 2011, and many people, including large numbers of army and security personnel, have been killed in the violence ever since.

The Syrian government says the chaos is being orchestrated from outside the country, and there are reports that a very large number of the militants are foreign nationals.


UN-Arab League special envoy t Russia China Syria Iran Bashar Assad Syria's problems protests in Syria Damascus Beijing Tehran the people of Syria the Syrian government in Syria Putin the hinese president Russian president the Syrian president Tao Hvjyn Terrorist forces in Syria armed men in Syriao Syria Lakhdar Brahimi
UN-Arab League special envoy to Syria Lakhdar Brahimi
Wed Jan 30, 2013 1:12AM GMT
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I'm sorry if I sound like an old broken record. The country [Syria] is breaking up before everyone's eyes.”

UN-Arab League special envoy to Syria Lakhdar Brahimi

UN-Arab League special envoy to Syria Lakhdar Brahimi says there is no end to the Syrian crisis and that the country is facing "unprecedented levels of horror."


Brahimi made the remarks in New York on Tuesday during a briefing to the United Nations Security Council on Syria, which has been facing a foreign-backed insurgency for nearly two years.

"I'm sorry if I sound like an old broken record. The country [Syria] is breaking up before everyone's eyes… The tragedy does not have an end,” Brahimi said.

Brahimi told the Security Council he was very concerned about an increasing danger of "contamination" which the countries around Syria are facing.

"There might be implications if the crisis continues spiraling. The refugee flow is becoming a matter of controversy in these countries," he added.

"None of the neighbors is immune to the fallout consequences of the conflict. The region is facing the risk of contamination," Brahimi noted.

Syria has been experiencing unrest since mid-March 2011. Many people, including large numbers of security personnel, have been killed in the violence.

The Syrian government says the chaos is being orchestrated from outside the country, and there are reports that a very large number of the militants fighting the Syrian government are foreign nationals.

And several international human rights organizations have accused the foreign-sponsored militants of committing war crimes.

On January 14, an international aid agency said the conflict in Syria is causing a "staggering humanitarian crisis" in the Middle East.

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) said in a 23-page report that more than 600,000 Syrians have fled the country because of violence, including gang rape.

The New York-based organization described the level of rape and sexual violence taking place in the conflict zones in Syria as "horrific."


A file photo of foreign-backed militants in Syria Russia China Syria Iran Bashar Assad Syria's problems protests in Syria Damascus Beijing Tehran the people of Syria the Syrian government in Syria Putin the hinese president Russian president the Syrian president Tao Hvjyn Terrorist forces in Syria armed men in Syria
A file photo of foreign-backed militants in Syria
Leaked documents from a UK-based defense contractor has revealed a Qatari proposal to the firm to counterfeit a plan to claim that Syria has given the go-ahead for the use of chemical weapons in the country.


The document, which was allegedly hacked from the UK-based company Britam Defence’s website, disclosed Qatar’s proposal to the contractor in return for a large sum of money, Lebanese Al-Manar TV reported on Tuesday.

An email exchange between two senior officials at Britam suggested that the scheme was approved by Washington, explaining that Qatar would fund the militants in Syria to use chemical weapons.

“We've got a new offer. It's about Syria again. Qataris propose an attractive deal and swear that the idea is approved by Washington,” a part of the leaked email read.

According to the documents, Qatar also suggested smuggling chemical warheads and rockets from Libya to the Syrian city of Homs.

Qatar apparently asked the British company to employ and film a Ukrainian person speaking and pretending to be Russian as part of “evidence” against Syria.

The new development comes as the head of Syria's opposition coalition, Ahmed Moaz al-Khatib, recently announced that Qatar has pledged USD 20 million to the coalition.

The recent scheme is devised at a time when the Syrian army forces have managed to clear the capital, Damascus and its surrounding areas of the militants and restore security to northwestern mountainous regions, including Idlib.

The Syrian unrest began in March 2011, and many people, including large numbers of army and security personnel, have been killed ever since.

The Syrian government says the chaos is being orchestrated from outside the country, and there are reports that a very large number of the militants are foreign nationals.

Damascus blames the West and its regional allies Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey for supporting the armed groups.